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Ingrid CRS-POP Gravel Cranks

$427.00

Component naming conventions generally befuddle me.  Grip Drive, Alloy Drive, Pressure Drive, asinine product numbers: give me a M-80032 SGS A.  Get outta here with that!  I have no idea what the CRS in the Ingrid CRS-POP crankset means.  I’m guessing it means Colloidal Remedial Saponification, but don’t quote me...

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Component naming conventions generally befuddle me.  Grip Drive, Alloy Drive, Pressure Drive, asinine product numbers: give me a M-80032 SGS A.  Get outta here with that!  I have no idea what the CRS in the Ingrid CRS-POP crankset means.  I’m guessing it means Colloidal Remedial Saponification, but don’t quote me on that.  That was a class I was in once, but let’s not go there.  

The POP part of the crank name is named after my grandfather, Pop-Pop.  Or was it Poppop?  Do you capitalize the second one?  If you write in all caps, no one is gunna call you out for getting it wrong.  PopPop (Poppop) must have been some grandfather naming convention that was hip in 1965, and my grandparents picked it out after reading an article in Sam’s Pretty Good Newspaper.  It’s debatably better than Pappy, Pops, Poppa, Big Poppa or Arthur the Elder.  

PopPop was called Rabbit in college, but when I knew him, he was more of a Galapagos Tortoise.  Heading to the car was a 30 minute ordeal of low speed shuffling, so if we had to be at dinner at 4:30 (get that early bird special!), you had to start heading toward to the car around 3:30, even though the restaurant was only 15 minutes away.  

Who knows how Ingrid figured out that PopPop used to be fast, and good at sports and such.  Someone tipped them off.  Think of these cranks as named after PopPop, pre 1959.  His max warp went down 1 mph a year for the next 40 years.  Until he was actually moving backward in time when he moved around.  

Ingrid makes these cranks in Italy, using blocks of aluminum stolen from the Campy factory up the road.*  The CRS-POP cranks are designed for gravel riding, road riding on bikes with wider tires like a 650b x 48mm tire, or XC / ATB bikes with tires narrower than 2.5”.  Get these cranks if you are under 180lbs, but for larger riders, you’re better off with a less drilled out crank, like the Ignite Inferno.  You can get the Ingrid CRS-POP in two spindle widths, 131mm or 136mm.  Get the right spindle for your BB width, which is explained below somewhere.  Nut shell, for you steel bike riders: 68mm shell gets the shorter spindle, 73 gets the wider spindle.  If you are running ye ole BSA bottom bracket shell, you can use any BSA 30 bottom bracket.  We like the White Industries one as well as the Wheels Manufacturing unit.  

You gotta use an Ingrid road, gravel or mtn ring on the CRS-Pop cranks.  They’re only differentiated by how many teeth they have.  The rings have a special tool for installation, which is really smart and minimal.  Get the tool when you get the cranks, so you can hang it on your wall and confound your tool nerd friends at your weekly tool trivia night.  Tell them it’s an Italian bottle opener.  

Other stuff:  the POP cranks are milled front and backside to reduce weight.  It has a certain Roy Lichtenstein  vibe, which Ingrid acknowledges in their website copy.  Probably a better component design influence than Morris Lewis, whom PopPop used to chat with while he was pouring stains down the canvases draped over his dining room chairs.**  I forget why they were hanging out, PTA I think.

Anyway, rad Italian cranks, in lots of fun colors, to spice up your bike that surely could use a little spice.  Email us to figure out what ring you want.  Ring isn’t included in the price, nor is the BB.  


*Not really.
** Actually True
131 spindle for 68mm BSA BB, or 386EVO, Pressfit 30, BB30, Pressfit BB86, 142mm or 135mm chainline

136 spindle for all boost applications, as well as BSA 73mm shells, PF 92 and PF 89.5