Shopping Cart

0

Your shopping bag is empty

Go to the shop

Rollcii 1” Threaded Headset

$50.00

Right now, as we watch, the 1” threaded headset is going extinct.  That’s a bummer on a number of levels.  1” threaded headsets are the first headsets that were manufactured on a massive scale, and they’ve been common fair on bikes for over 100 years.  Threaded headsets started to go...

Color

Right now, as we watch, the 1” threaded headset is going extinct.  That’s a bummer on a number of levels.  1” threaded headsets are the first headsets that were manufactured on a massive scale, and they’ve been common fair on bikes for over 100 years.  Threaded headsets started to go away in the early 90’s, when mountain bikers started getting all sendy and straightening the brims of their hat with their mom’s hair iron.  Downhill mountain biking spelled the expulsion of threaded headsets.  They tried stay relative, by bulking up on protein shakes, but according to Andy, those make you gassy, so we know that didn’t last.  There were 1 1/8” threaded headsets, and then even 1 1/4” threaded headsets.  Eventually, we lost the thread all together, and started to make threadless headsets.  Look:  I’m not against threadless headsets, I like them.  I just think there is still a place at the table for threaded headsets.  That place is non-race oriented road bikes, touring bikes, town bikes, kids bikes, and really anything where you are not gunna get sendy.  The beauty of the threaded headset isn’t in the threads at all, it’s that threaded headsets mean you are running a quill stem, and quill stems are things of simple and singular beauty.  

To raise or lower a quill stem, you loose one bolt and slide it up and down.  So dang simple.  Not that one needs to move their bars up and down a lot, but it’s nice to know you can do it, easily.  

Back to the great extinction.  Progress marches along, and sloughes off perfectly good things like rotary phones, laser discs and Crystal Pepsi.  All of these will one day have a second coming, foretold in the Scrolls thusly:

When Bob Girvin and Horst Leitner and Dan Hanebrink will gather on the Mount of Olive Anodized Parts, and Lo! the weight of the past will consume the progressolites in a ball of flame brighter still than the brightest Tig Welding torch, and the heavy harvest yellow Rotary Phone shall spin its wheel of fate all clickety clickety, and smote those who seek to come up with false headset standards.  And the Luddites shall show the Progressolites their own reflection in the surface of the sacred lazer disc, and they shall be shamed, and blinded by the truthiness, only to stumble forthly into the Sea of Kooka, drowning in the furious waters of NOS overpriced billet parts.  And the Sea of Kooka will fetch them up upon the shores of Caramba, with the sun setting upon their ruined souls.  

As far as I can tell, there are only a few GOOD threaded headsets left.  We happen to have access to the best affordable one, and the best retro grouch one.  For the retro grouch one, see the Campy Athena.  It’s expensive and gorgeous.

The Rollcii 1” threaded headset looks classic, with it’s bubble shape and simple lines.  If you put it on a 1986 Miyata, no one is going to squawk, or at least no one that bears listening to.  If your headset has sealed bearings like this one, they should be replaceable, not just ’serviceable’ like that company that rhymes with miss bling.  Good sealed bearings last a very long time, can be serviced AND eventually replaced.  Sometimes things get all pitted cause you rode thru a Hurricane (yes I’ve had customers do that) and then your bearings are sad town.  If you can’t replace them, then your headset is trash.  Boo!  

The Rollcii headset uses affordable angular contact bearings.  You don’t need swanky headset bearings.  Ceramic bearings in headsets (or anywhere, but especially headsets) are ridiculous.  You want to turn in a mannered, predictable way.  A tiny bit of bearing drag is fine.  

Like all threaded headsets, you need two tools to adjust these:  A big ass crescent wrench, like the Unior one we sell, and a 32mm headset wrench, like the… Unior one we sell.  The big wrench goes on the top, the 32mm wrench on the bottom.  

I won’t get into how to adjust these here, that’s a whole can of worms, but do put bee’s wax on the threads of the fork before you install the threaded portion of the headset.  

We have these 1” threaded headsets in Black or Silver.

26.4 crown race, for all decent quality, non-French bikes.  If in doubt, get some Unior calipers and measure the fork’s crown race.  27.0mm?  No worries we can still get you a decent headset, just not this one.  

29mm stack for the top half, 11.5 for the bottom.