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50' 1.8mm Dyneema Dynaglide for Tarp Ridgeline/Bear Bag Hanging

$19.00

Seems bonkers town, but 50’ of rope is about what you need for an effective bear bag set up.  ‘Bear bag’ of course is just short hand for Bear Porcupine Squirrel Chipmunk Possum Skunk Raccoon Mouse Bag.  You don’t just need it for bears.  You need it so you eat...

Seems bonkers town, but 50’ of rope is about what you need for an effective bear bag set up.  ‘Bear bag’ of course is just short hand for Bear Porcupine Squirrel Chipmunk Possum Skunk Raccoon Mouse Bag.  You don’t just need it for bears.  You need it so you eat your food, not Ranger Rick.  Shout out to yourself in your cubicle if you remember Ranger Rick.  


While there are bear bags which resist bear meddling, we recommend hanging the bag o’ food, and hanging it high.  The Analog method, which I am sure is not perfect, is to stick a rock in a small stuff sack and tie that to one end of the line.  The other end gets the sack of food, toothpaste, anything smelly.  Use a Bowline if you know it, two half hitches if you don’t.  That’s easier and works 90% as well.  


Toss the rock sack over the highest branch you can, 10’ or so out from the side of a tree.  Have a friend haul the bag up over their head while you untie the rock sack and haul on the non food end of the line.  Wrap the line around a big stick for a better grip if the food is extra heavy.  Once the bag is a good 15’ off the ground, you can tie the rope off around a tree.  I always do two half hitches for that.  


Could a bear wack the rope and pull the bag down? Yes.  Will they?  Probably not.  Are there bear bag techniques that are fool proof but also take 30 minutes of scouting and 2 hours of set up?  Yes.  If that’s how you want to spend your time in the woods, go right ahead!  


Here’s my recommendation: if you have no bear line, and never pack any sort of rope or line, get two of these.  One for bear baggin’, and one that you can cut up and splice back as needed, for clothes lines, tarp set up, guy lines, or tying up your bikepacking partner after they tell one too many dad jokes.


Why is this line spendy?  


Dyneema doesn’t absorb water, so the line stays light and rot free.  It’s very strong, and can hold way more weight than much heavier and bulkier paracord.  847 lbs.  That’s a lot of food.  Meanwhile 50 feet of this cord weighs less than 2 oz.  


I’ve never gone on a decent length trip and thought: damn I brought too much line.  I’ve only had the opposite thought.  Rope is useful.  No rope is not useful.